Situaciones de inclusión/exclusión mediante el juego en Educación Primaria

  • Valeria Varea New South Wales. Australia
  • Sithembile Ndhlovu New South Wales. Australia
Palabras clave: niños de educación primaria, jugar, juegos, exclusión/inclusión

Resumen

El propósito de este estudio fue explorar el modo en que los niños de la escuela primaria incluyen o excluyen a otros niños en situaciones de juego. Dos escuelas primarias de la localidad de Armidale, New South Wales, Australia, participaron en este proyecto. Observaciones y entrevistas interactivas fueron utilizadas para la recolección de datos, los cuales fueron sometidos a un análisis de contenido. Los resultados sugieren que los participantes emplearon diversas estrategias para excluir a algunos de sus compañeros de juego. También se descubrió que la exclusión puede ser utilizada para mantener o establecer nuevas amistades entre los niños. De los resultados de esta investigación se extraen conclusiones relativas a las estrategias que pueden utilizar los adultos que traten de promover la inclusión de los niños mediante el juego.

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Publicado
10/01/2018
Sección
Artículos